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MIDDAY - HEADLINE SEMINAR - "Tackling the Thorniest Issues" - Richard Bampfield MW, Stephen Skelton MW & Matt Strugnell, Vineyard Manager at Ridgeview

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The headline seminar this year will be presented by Richard Bampfield MW, with Stephen Skelton MW and Ridgeview Wine Estate vineyard manager Matthew Strugnell. They will be tackling the topics of yield, frost prevention, and weed, pest and disease control.

A session not to be missed by anyone in the industry looking to hear from very exceptional experience.

Richard Bampfield MW
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Richard Bampfield passed his Master of Wine exam in 1990, having graduated in French from Cambridge in 1981 he immediately decided the
wine trade was where he could put the language to best use. Richard Bampfield has worked around the world in vineyards and wine cellars, as well as managing retail wine shops in the North West of England for JW Lees Brewers for seven years. After passing his MW, he joined the Australian
producer Brown Brothers and managed their European operations until 1999. He left them to set up his own company, specialising in public relations and offering wine talks, tours and courses. His clients include Lidl, Albert Bichot (Burgundy), Leith's School of Food and Wine, Santa Rita (Chile) and Chateau Brown. Richard Bampfield is a past Chairman of the Association of Wine Educators and was the European Champagne Ambassador 2009

Matt Strugnell
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Ridgeview Wine Estate says that Matthew Strugnell is responsible for making sure they have the best grapes they need to produce fantastic wine.
He started working for Ridgeview in 2002 and now has responsibility of all their vineyards in which he works tirelessly to ensure the highest
quality fruit. He also provides valued advice and support to all Ridgeview’s partnership vineyards.

Stephen Skelton, MW
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Stephen Skelton has been involved with growing vines and making wine since 1975. He spent two years in Germany, working at Schloss Schönborn
in the Rheingau and studying at Geisenheim, the world-renowned winegrowing and winemaking college, with the late Professor Helmut Becker.
In 1977 he returned to the UK to establish the vineyards at Tenterden in Kent (now the home of the UK’s largest wine producer, Chapel Down Wines), and made wine there for 22 consecutive vintages. From 1988 to 1991 he was also winemaker and general manager at Lamberhurst vineyards, at that time the largest winery in the UK. He now works as a consultant to vineyards and wineries in the UK and is currently setting up vineyards to produce sparkling wine


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Bearley Vineyard

New member
There is no mention of what is now called the Midlands and North region in the yield survey. Contrary to the opinion of some in the industry, we really can grow grapes successfully this far north if we choose the right site and varieties. I have submitted a return for both 2018 and 2019, with yields that knock the average figures for the other regions into a cocked hat, so I know that at least one vineyard submitted a report. Did any other vineyard in the region take part? Why is the region not mentioned in the yield survey?
 

Giz Gaskin

New member
Good afternoon

Thank you Richard, Matt and Stephen for a very informative discussion on yields in viticulture and the striking variation temperature has year on year with yield. I wanted to ask if you would agree Stephen, that UK Vines are not shy of Calcium Nitrate with a view to increased yields and healthier crops?

Best regards Giz
 

hugh

New member
with quality quality quality being the absolute core of production coupled with the huge rise in planting do you see a need soon for some
hard decisions in HA's grown and grubbing , while yields may be looking good for 2020 there are big supplies from previous years around and covid /economics in the next few years will make sales probably more challenging
 

spskelton

New member
Not quite sure what you mean by "hard decisions in HA's grown and grubbing" as nobody can control who plants what and where. Its not like in Champagne where you need permission. Only economics will make people stop and think.
 
with quality quality quality being the absolute core of production coupled with the huge rise in planting do you see a need soon for some
hard decisions in HA's grown and grubbing , while yields may be looking good for 2020 there are big supplies from previous years around and covid /economics in the next few years will make sales probably more challenging
I agree there will be challenges ahead. But I am also confident they can be overcome. The UK wine business has spent the last 20 years investing in the training of a new generation of viticulturists and winemakers. We must now focus more on the sales and marketing part of the business.
 

Jonathan

New member
I guess the inter row distance of 2 to 2.2 m and inter vine distance of 0.85 to 1.0 m apply to either Guyot or Royat pruning methods. Is anyone in the UK using the Lyre system which in France is giving very good quality grapes, and if so what should the inter row and inter vine distances be in the UK for this system?
 

Plantex

New member
Excellent presentation. Regarding Frost Protection, there is another frost protection method that was not listed; the strip water sprinkler (or the "Flipper" sprinkler). It is cost-effective and proven to work at very low temperatures. Have you considered this option? @Matt Strugnell
 

Giz Gaskin

New member
Going back to @Matt Strugnell 's discussion on temperature and the need to consider field heaters. Has there been much thought to growing the vine under tunnels? If the temp rise required is only some 4C, most Polly tunnels can deliver that with out the need to use a field heater. There may be further benefits of being under tunnel coming into a cool September harvest.
 

Matt Strugnell

New member
We supplied the system at East Malling. We'll be interested in talking with you about this at some point.
Hi Yes indeed -
Well known for it's effectiveness IF you have access to a large amount of water. Equivalent to 5mm rainfall per hour required (from memory) Has been used on other fruit crops in the uk too. Wouldn't be suitable on all soils - needs to be really free draining
 
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